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HOT OR COLD?

Hot or cold?

 

Objective:

To understand the difference between heat and temperature through practical activities where thermal sensations are compared with measurements performed with temperature probes.

Ludwig Eduard Boltzmann
(Wien, 20 February 1844 - Duino, Trieste, 5 September 1906)

has been one of the most important theoretical physicists of all ages. His fame is due to his researches in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (the fundamental equation of kinetic theory of gasses and the second law of Thermodynamics). He contributed also to mechanics, electromagnetism, mathematics and philosophy. His innovative ideas (on atomism, irreversibility, etc.) raised many discussions and were often misinterpreted and refused.
(text and image from Wikipedia the open encyclopaedia).


This simple experience makes the student realize that hot and cold sensations as detected by our senses do not only depend on other bodies temperature but also on our initial body temperature. It helps recognizing the difference between heat and temperature.


[ Theory  |  Apparatus setup  |  Data acquisition  |   Data sample  |  Data analysis (TI84)  |  Data analysis (MSExcel)  |  PDF version of the module |  Evaluation form   |  Teacher's guide  |  Back to Experiments  ]



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